13_16-42_shanghai_skyline.jpgThis is our first post about the blogosphere, before someone accuses EngagingChina of navel-gazing. But I thought I'd flag the forthcoming ad:tech Shanghai
conference, running 18-19 October, which will presumably be besieged by
China-based bloggers and others flying the flag for Web 2.0.

Jack
Ma, founder and CEO of Alibaba.com is the star attraction and is always
worth listening to, if only because he is the only head of a Chinese
internet company who is widely known in the west.

Other sessions
provide a low-down on topics as diverse as mobile marketing, video
mash-ups, interactive gaming and “the evolving Chinese consumer
landscape.”

For those not employed in the internet industry, I
know these events can seem of doubtful relevance. Nevertheless, there
are representatives from bricks-and-mortar businesses speaking at the
event, including Ford Motor, TNT Direct Marketing and Johnson &
Johnson.

There are also couple of sessions on the weird and
wonderful world of Web 2.0, a term that includes social networking like
blogs and other technologies for collaboration and sharing. Its
surprising the growing number of mainstream companies in the west that
are now taking a growing interest in Web 2.0. Some see China as equally
fertile ground.

Shaun Rein, MD of the China Market Research Group (CMR) and a speaker at the event, says:

Companies
have to realise the importance that Web 2.0 can have on their
operations and develop strategies to take advantage of the fast-growing
blogosphere. It is especially true when considering that most of
China's bloggers fall within the coveted 18-25 year old age group.”

Nevertheless,
I'm not sure how much of the buzz that surrounds social networking
technologies in the west will rub off in China, where the government
likes to keep a tight control on the media, the internet and most other
forms of expression.

In a previous story , EngagingChina
looked at the problems facing the likes of Facebook and Myspace if they
enter China, and the blogosphere is full of stories of China bloggers
being arrested for overstepping the line.

Technorati : , , ,

email